Peter Clossick

Works
Biography

Clossick ‘makes us feel the present, the here and now of our being in the world, the joy and the anguish of life in moments of heightened sensation. This is never a simple description of the outer skin of things, but rather a multi-layered, multi-toned articulation of physical realities.’

Born in 1948, Clossick’s life as a professional artist began with an epiphany on Hampstead Heath. After a day of drawing for a shoe design studio in Mayfair, he was hit with the realisation that after a period of drawing what he had designed, he wanted to draw as he experienced. This prompted Clossick’s years at Camberwell, during which the school was saturated in the Bomberg/Coldstream tradition, also known as the ‘Bombstream’. Clossick went on to further study at Goldsmiths’ College in London. Clossick first exhibited his works in 1979 at Corpus Christi College, Oxford. Clossick has gone on to hold solo exhibitions in galleries across London, his most recent being a 2019 exhibition entitled Retroactive at The Cello Factory. Amidst his many solo exhibitions, Clossick’s works have been shown in multiple two-person and group shows throughout Europe since 1989. His paintings have been chosen year after year to be featured in selective prize exhibitions such as the Hunting Art Prize, the ING Discerning Eye, the Lynn Painter-Stainers Prize, the Threadneedle Prize and the Royal Academy Summer Exhibition. Clossick’s paintings are held in collections across the UK, including Greenwich College, Life Long Learning UK, Lyndon Hall Studio Collection, Moorefields Eye Hospital and the Working Men’s College. He is a three-time winner of the Lynn Painter-Stainers prize. Clossick’s self-portrait was acquired by Ruth Borchard Collection in 2015.  Clossick is a current member and former President of The London Group, he is also an active member of the New English Art Club. 

 

Clossick’s work began with a search for the ‘spirit in the mass’ that Ruth Borchard Early Collection artist David Bomberg sought in his later years. Both Clossick’s landscapes and portraits seek to emphasise the way in which we cannot stand outside what we wish to depict, every brushstroke blending consciousness with experience. Author Corrina Lotz described Clossick’s work as speaking ‘of the uncertainties, anxieties and mysteries of existence of our time’, Lotz argues that Clossick ‘makes us feel the present, the here and now of our being in the world, the joy and the anguish of life in moments of heightened sensation. This is never a simple description of the outer skin of things, but rather a multi-layered, multi-toned articulation of physical realities.’