Lucy Jones

Works
Biography

Born in London in 1955, Lucy Jones studied at Byam Shaw School of Drawing and Painting followed by Camberwell School of Art. It was at Camberwell that her budding painting style was nourished by two visiting tutors, Frank Auberbach and Leon Kossoff. Jones then went on to study at the Royal College of Art, where she was awarded the Prix de Rome prize which allowed her to study at the British School in Rome for two years. During this time, Jones was awarded the 1980 Cubitt Award for Painting and the 1982 Anstruther Award for Painting.

Jones's first solo exhibition was held at the Flowers Gallery, London in 1987. She has since exhibited her work extensively in both London and New York through Flowers Gallery, who represent Jones. In addition to her many Flowers Gallery exhibitions, Jones has exhibited her work at Whitechapel Gallery, the Mall Galleries and Kings Place Gallery in London and the Ashmolean Museum of Art in Oxford. Jones's work is held in numerous public collections including those of the Arts Council, the Contemporary Arts Society and the National Portrait Gallery in London and The Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York. Ruth Borchard Collection acquired Jones's self-portrait in 2013.

Not primarily a figurative portraitist, Jones is known for what she refers to as her 'building portraits.' These architectural images are inspired by the Georgian architecture that surrounds Jones's home in Edinburgh's New Town. Jones works intuitively, layering materials and mediums, using texts and images where relevant to capture the literary and visual histories of her architectural subjects. While her materials are everchanging, her final flourish remains the same. Jones adds a layer of hot wax to each piece, letting the wax choose which elements come to the fore of her work.

Jones's self-portrait steps away from her 'building portraits', taking the self as her subject. Jones stands, painted in muted oils, her arm at once disappearing into and embracing the bright red background of the canvas, sealed with her signature layer of hot wax.