Alex Fowler

Works
Biography

‘How does our eye scan a space? What does it land on? When you are painting one particular moment in a subject, we have this tendency to telescope in on it and actually that is mostly not how we experience being in the world. We do if we are trying to spot someone walking down the street from a distance, for example, but mostly we are not so aware of looking and I’ve tried to get that experience into my painting.’

Born in London in 1975, Alex Fowler studied Art History at Edinburgh University and went on to study painting at Heatherly's School of Fine Art where Fowler was awarded the Heatherly's Prize. Fowler went on to hold his first exhibition at Carlyle Gallery in London in 2003. Fowler has since held multiple solo exhibitions at The Studio Gallery, The Cedar House Gallery, The Russel Gallery, The Table Gallery and Gallery 27. Fowler has been the recipient of numerous awards, including the New English Art Club Drawing Scholarship, the Woodhay Gallery Prize and the Arts Club Prize. Fowler is a member of the New English Art Club and currently teaches at both Chelsea Wharf, where he teaches both portrait and landscape painting and Kensington Gardens, where he leads his students how to view the landscape from a painterly perspective.

Fowler predominantly works in oils with his subject matter ranging from still lifes to landscapes and portraits. His interest is in the experience of looking, which Fowler views as the real subject of his art, no matter what he is painting. On his interest where perception meets painting, Fowler has said, 'How does our eye scan a space? What does it land on? When you are painting one particular moment in a subject, we have this tendency to telescope in on it and actually that is mostly not how we experience being in the world. We do if we are trying to spot someone walking down the street from a distance, for example, but mostly we are not so aware of looking and I've tried to get that experience into my painting.'

In Riley Self-Portrait, Fowler explores the experience of the self in the world through oil paint. The smoothly painted colourful wall behind Fowler emphasises just how detailed his self-depiction is with Fowler's placement encouraging the eye to scan both space and subject.